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Latest Updates

  • Sal Brinton speaking at Lib Dem conference.
    Article: Aug 15, 2018

    It may be mid-August but the bad news about Brexit is increasing by the day! Senior Brexiteers such as Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg continue to peddle their populist nonsense, against the facts: the pound dropping against the Euro; international organisations moving their EU HQ out of Britain; and even the Governor of the Bank of England confirming Brexit will not be good for the economy. Only Vince Cable and the Lib Dems remain totally committed to an Exit from Brexit, and giving the people a Final Say on the deal, with more regions that voted leave now changing their minds.

  • Article: Aug 14, 2018

    The last ten days have seen major stories of racism in both of Britain's major parties.

    What is happening in the Labour party - and Boris Johnson's comments this week - are frightening to many Jewish and Muslim people living in Britain.

    This is a reflection of the way the politics of identity dominates politics today and attracts comments, sometimes critical or offensive, about particular groups.

  • Vince Cable at 2018 Spring Conference
    Article: Aug 11, 2018
    By Ashley Cowburn in The Independent

    Lib Dem Leader Sir Vince Cable is set to claim it is possible to legislate for a fresh referendum within weeks and for it to be held before the Article 50 process expires.

    In a speech during a rally on Saturday - organised by the People's Vote campaign for a fresh referendum - Sir Vince is expected to dismiss concerns from Brexiteer "fanatics" that there is no time to get legislation through parliament for a second public vote.

  • Nick Harvey | Image: Chatham House
    Article: Aug 10, 2018

    After the 2015 election disaster, a comprehensive post-mortem led by James Gurling analysed what had gone wrong and made a huge number of detailed recommendations of what should be done differently next time.

    However, the snap election of 2017, coming just two years later and out of left field, meant that we were still recovering from 2015 and had not had much chance to implement many of those changes.